Originating on Maryland's Eastern Shore in the late 1800's, the Skipjack was better known as a two-sail bateau with a V-hull.
Funded in part by a grant from
The Lower Shore Heritage Area Council

Skipjack Heritage Museum

and Community Center

SHI Museum small (35K)

Originating on Maryland's Eastern Shore in the late 1800's, the Skipjack was better known as a two-sail bateau with a V-hull. The ship evolved into what is now a larger version known as the Skipjack. Ranging in length from 25 to 50 feet, the shallow draft with centerboard, single mast, two-sail sloop rigged vessel once roamed the Chesapeake in the hundreds. Most were built by house carpenters and local watermen who fished for the elusive bivalve, the oyster. Now, some 100 plus years later, only a handful fish the bay, numbering in just the teens.

SHi6 (21K)

Skipjack Heritage, Inc. promotes appreciation for the Skipjacks, their owners, captains, crews and families, as well as the seafood industry and the watermen's way of life in general, in order to preserve the social and cultural heritage for current and future generations.

Deal Old (52K)

We also support local watermen, civic organizations and events with similar goals. We are currently developing an educational program with the state's universities and a skipjack museum for the Deal Island area.

SHI1 (28K)

These are lofty goals for a small organization with limited resources. To accomplish them, Skipjack Heritage, Inc. encourages general membership for individuals and businesses.

Peppermint (29K)

Saving the Skipjack George W, Collier, one peppermint orange at a time, Bayley Powers and her family of Chance, MD. raised $500.50 at Deal Island Skipjack 2016 Festival for the restoration of the George W. Collier. Bayley was runner-up in 2016 Miss Skipjack Contest. Bob Shores and William Wheatley accepts check from Bayley at Skipjack Heritage Museum in Chance, MD.

Home|About Us|Find Us|Contact Us